Letters

Another step needed to address flooding

Carolyn Steglich

Harrisville

In the article “Officials to address storm water” in the July 17 edition of the Allied News, Grove City Council president Joel Bigley is quoted as saying “These rain events seem to be occurring more and more” and that “storm-related flash flooding has become a frequent occurrence.”

Plans to study the problem and discuss mitigation efforts with engineers is an excellent idea for managing this serious problem for residents of Grove City, but it’s not the only step needed.

Another tactic is to go after the cause of these damaging rain events, namely climate change caused by emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel extraction and use.

H.R. 763, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, will do exactly that. Experts in climate science and economics agree that a price on carbon is the single most effective way to address this problem and prevent catastrophic effects from climate change (yes, it could get even worse!). This bill will charge a fee for carbon at its production source (well, mine or port) and then the money raised will be returned to all households as a monthly dividend, which will offset the increase in costs of carbon-intensive products and processes.

Most Americans will come out ahead with the dividend on costs, and the bill encourages energy conservation and innovation for a sustainable, low-carbon energy future. This is a nonpartisan, market-based approach to address an important problem.

Readers can learn more about this legislation at energyinnovationact.org or at ccl.org and then lobby our representatives in Congress to move on it. There are 57 cosponsors of the bill in the House so far, but Rep. Mike Kelly isn’t one of them. The companion bill in the Senate has yet to be introduced this year, so Sen. Casey and Sen. Toomey also need encouragement.

Interested persons are also invited to meet with the Slippery Rock chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby to find out more about how we can work together to promote a sensible energy policy for the future.

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