Schoefield church booklet offers interesting facts

A booklet dated July 19, 1998, and handed out to those attending the Schoefield United Methodist Church’s observance of its 100th anniversary, will soon be 20 years old. Several years ago, the church closed its doors for the last time and was sold. But the history of the building/church includes interesting facts.

A booklet dated July 19, 1998, and handed out to those attending the Schoefield United Methodist Church’s observance of its 100th anniversary, will soon be 20 years old. 

Several years ago, the church closed its doors for the last time and was sold. But the history of the building/church includes interesting facts.

All the information here is taken from the booklet.

The George Carrol Estate gave land where the present building stands in the village known as Millbrook. The name Schoefield came from Rev. John Cook Schoefield, district superintendent at that time.

The timber for the church came from Sandy Lake by horse and wagon.

A millstone in front of the building provided the ladies assurance their shoes and hems of their dresses would not get dirty from the ground.

An area under the floor was dug out to put a furnace and large grate in the middle of the church for heating. The only source of lighting was by way of oil lamps hanging from the ceiling. Later, milk glass globes replaced the lamps, and hung from the ceiling.

Marian Gurney drew the outline of the basement and it was built in 1954. The men of the church dug the basement by hand. For a 20-cent fee, one could buy a cement block and have his or her name inscribed.

The first seats in the church were theater seats. In 1964, pews from the Sandy Lake Presbyterian Church were installed.

In 1963, the organ used at that time was sold to Jake and Elizabeth DeBence, of the Antique Museum in Franklin. In 1969, siding for the church cost $3,400 and red carpeting was $1,250.

The Lend A Hand Club, organized around 1933 or 1934 by Mrs. Dorothy (Ben) Limber, was composed of young married ladies, high school and college girls. They held ice cream suppers, oyster suppers, even a box social. The members embroidered monthly quilt patches and each member was given 12 patches to put together and make a quilt.

In the booklet of 20 years ago, Sara Bindas was listed as a 67-year member and Alfred Little a 62-year member.

Names of 35 other members who had at least 22 years attendance and up to 55 years were listed.

Rev. Tim Rogers and wife Shirley welcomed everyone to the centennial observance.

Former ministers and wives attending were Rev. Russell and Marge Hines, Rev. Edwin and Doris McElroy, Rev. James and Wilma Hamilton, and also Vina Best, widow of Rev. Jack Best who pastored the church from 1953 to 1956.

Sunshine from the east filters through the large church windows on Sunday mornings.

The sanctuary was arranged so this inspiring light was to the congregation’s back and also focused light on the speakers beyond.

Here’s to beautiful memories of a special congregation and church in Millbrook.