LETTERS

Kudos to Longietti, sole lawmaker of four to attend Q&A

Polly Kimes

Sandy Lake

Amazing: the League of Women Voters of Mercer County hosted their annual legislative interview luncheon on a beautiful Friday afternoon with sunny skies and clear roads. Topics of discussion were voting modernization, redistricting reform and environmental protection. In addition, questions from a bipartisan audience would be answered. However, the only representative who attended this event was Democrat Mark Longietti. Absent from the forum were Republicans Tedd Nesbit, Michelle Brooks and Parke Wentling.

This was a bipartisan event and kudos to Longietti for being approachable and answering the questions and concerns of this bipartisan group. However, I think it is time for the three Republicans – who have concerns about being out of their comfort zone and being approachable to the taxpayers of Mercer County – to not seek reelection. 

Therefore, I have enclosed an application for employment for the taxpayers of Mercer County. 

Wanted: A few good men or women to seek election for the taxpayers of Mercer County. Great benefits, great salary, paid health care, state pension, many weeks of paid vacation, sick days, family leave and you only have to attend public events that you want at your leisure. 

Qualifications: open mind, sense of humor, willing to work well with others, help to improve Mercer County with decent paying jobs, health care, programs for drug addiction, community blight, repair of a 100-year-old tunnel on Route 62, public transportation, broadband, and support of commonsense gun reform. All applicants apply at the county courthouse.

 

Fixing unfair districting is worth the work

John Greenlee

Sandy Lake

Our State Supreme Court has just ruled that it is time to redraw voting districts and undo the unfair gerrymandering practice that has favored the Republicans.

Righting a wrong sometimes takes extra effort and work. But that’s exactly what must be done, instead of complaining about the change.

According to an article in the Herald, Jeff Greenberg, Mercer County’s director of voter registration and elections, commented Thursday at an election board meeting that this ruling risks causing problems for them, citing time, location and staff issues. He also said that the board is going to do what they are told because they don’t have a choice. I say get to it and stop waiting for a possible overturn by the U.S. Supreme Court, which he alluded to. I won’t ask Greenberg who he voted for in the last election like Trump did of another government employee, but I’m quite sure of his party affiliation.

Trump does what is needed

Howard Glass

Grove City

Trump, the first son.

“What do you think? [Jesus asked] There was a man who had two sons. He went to the first and said, ‘Son, go and work today in the vineyard.’” “’I will not,’ he answered, but later he changed his mind and went.

“Then the father went to the other son and said the same thing. He answered, ‘I will, sir,’ but he did not go. Which of the two did what his father wanted?”

“The first,” they answered. Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes are entering the kingdom of God ahead of you.” (Gospel of Matthew 21: 28-31)

Trump is the first son in this story. Although selfish in his manners, when it came right down to it, he answered the call and did what was needed. The established politicians are the second son. They care about their image, but when it comes to what really matters, they don’t show up. Burdened by self-serving government, we have long craved an outsider. Now we have one, and his presidency may be the most consequential of our time.

Trump’s style confounds and distracts his enemies. While he works to change things for the better, their energy is spent trying to convince us that he is a tax collector or prostitute. How illuminating.

Sooner or later, for better or worse, the Trump era will end. But the shift in our expectations from leaders should remain.

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